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Buying a business vehicle by December 31 can reduce your 2017 tax bill. The vehicle may qualify for Sec. 179 expensing, allowing you to immediately deduct, rather than depreciate over several years, some or all of the cost. The normal Sec. 179 expensing limit of $510,000 generally applies to vehicles weighing more than 14,000 pounds. […]

Charitable giving can be a powerful tax-saving strategy: Donations are generally fully deductible, and you control when and how much you give. To ensure you receive your desired tax benefits, remember that, to be deductible on your 2017 return, a donation must be made by Dec. 31, 2017, to a “qualified charity” (one eligible to […]

Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines affecting businesses and other employers during the first quarter of 2018. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact us to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing requirements. January […]

The year is quickly drawing to a close, but there’s still time to take steps to reduce your 2017 tax liability — you just must act by December 31: Pay your 2017 property tax bill that’s due in early 2018. Make your January 1 mortgage payment. Incur deductible medical expenses (if your deductible medical expenses […]

With the possibility that tax law changes could go into effect next year that would significantly reduce income tax rates for many businesses, 2017 may be an especially good year to accelerate deductible expenses. Why? Deductions save more tax when rates are higher. Timing income and expenses can be a little more challenging for accrual-basis […]

Because their cultures are oriented toward helping others, nonprofits often find it impossible to imagine that anyone working for them would steal. As a result, too many charities neglect to put proper internal controls in place and, if they’re defrauded, refuse to seek prosecution of the perpetrator. Such attitudes can lead to heavy financial losses. […]

A qualified small business (QSB) eligible for the research tax credit can elect to use up to $250,000 of the credit to reduce its payroll tax bill instead of its income tax bill. Generally, a QSB has gross receipts of less than $5 million for the current tax year and hasn’t existed for more than […]

Two valuable depreciation-related tax breaks can potentially reduce your 2017 taxes if you acquire and place in service qualifying assets by the end of the tax year. Tax reform could enhance these breaks, so you’ll want to keep an eye on legislative developments as you plan your asset purchases. Section 179 expensing Sec. 179 expensing […]

At this time of year, it’s common for businesses to make thank-you gifts to customers, clients, employees and other business entities and associates. Unfortunately, the tax rules limit the deduction for business gifts to $25 per person per year, a limitation that has remained the same since it was added into law back in 1962. […]

Did you know that if you’re self-employed you may be able to set up a retirement plan that allows you to contribute much more than you can contribute to an IRA or even an employer-sponsored 401(k)? There’s still time to set up such a plan for 2017, and it generally isn’t hard to do. So […]

Accelerating deductible expenses, such as property tax on your home, into the current year typically is a good idea. Why? It will defer tax, which usually is beneficial. Prepaying property tax may be especially beneficial this year, because proposed tax legislation might reduce or eliminate the benefit of the property tax deduction beginning in 2018. […]

A fundamental tax planning strategy is to accelerate deductible expenses into the current year. This typically will defer (and in some cases permanently reduce) tax. But there are exceptions. One is if the additional deductions this year trigger the alternative minimum tax (AMT). Complicating matters for 2017 is possible tax reform that could repeal the […]

All “income investments” (those that pay dividends or interest) aren’t alike when it comes to taxes. Qualified dividends are taxed at your favorable long-term capital gains rate rather than your higher ordinary-income rate. Interest generally is taxed at ordinary-income rates. So stocks paying qualified dividends might be more attractive tax-wise than CDs and bonds. But […]

A dynasty trust can protect your wealth from gift, estate and generation-skipping transfer (GST) taxes and help you leave a lasting legacy. Contributions to the trust are considered taxable gifts, but you can minimize taxes by applying your gift and GST tax exemptions. Trust assets can grow and compound indefinitely. The trust makes distributions to […]

On October 12, an executive order was signed that, among other things, seeks to expand Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs). HRAs are just one type of tax-advantaged account you can provide your employees to help fund their health care expenses. Also available are Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs). Which one should you […]

The $14,000 annual exclusion is limited to gifts of a “present interest,” defined by IRS regulations as “an unrestricted right to the immediate use, possession, or enjoyment of property or the income from property.” Generally, gifts to a trust designed to distribute assets to beneficiaries at a future date won’t qualify. But a Crummey trust […]

Out-of-pocket medical expenses may be deductible if they exceed 10% of your adjusted gross income. By “bunching” nonurgent medical expenses into alternating years, you may be able to exceed the floor. The “Unified Framework for Fixing Our Broken Tax Code” President Trump and congressional Republicans released on Sept. 27 proposes, among other things, increasing the […]

If you own an unincorporated business with your spouse, you may face high self-employment (SE) taxes. An unincorporated business in which both spouses are active is typically treated by the IRS as a partnership owned 50/50 by the spouses. For 2017, that means you’ll each pay the maximum 15.3% SE tax rate on the first […]